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    NFTs – What is that? How Do NFTs Work?

    This year, non-fungible tokens (NFTs) appear to have exploded from the ether. These digital assets, which range from art and music to tacos and toilet paper, are selling like 17th-century exotic Dutch tulips, with some fetching millions of dollars.

    Are NFTs, on the other hand, worth the money—or the hype? Some analysts believe they, like the dotcom mania and Beanie Babies, are about to burst. Others feel that NFTs are here to stay and will forever revolutionize investment.

    NFTs: What are they?

    An NFT is a digital asset that depicts real-world elements like art, music, in-game items, and films. They’re bought and traded online, often using cryptocurrency, and they’re usually encoded with the same software as many other cryptos. Despite the fact that they’ve been around since 2014, NFTs are currently gaining popularity as a popular means to buy and sell digital artwork. Since November 2017, a whopping $174 million has been spent on NFTs.

    NFTs are also one-of-a-kind, or at the very least, one of the very small runs, and contain unique identifying codes. “Essentially, NFTs generate digital scarcity,” explains Arry Yu, managing director of Yellow Umbrella Ventures and chair of the Washington Technology Industry Association’s Cascadia Blockchain Council. This is in sharp contrast to the vast majority of digital products, which are nearly always available in endless quantities. If a certain asset is in demand, cutting down the supply should theoretically increase its value.

    However, many NFTs have been digital works that already exist in some form elsewhere, such as legendary video clips from NBA games or securitized versions of digital art that are already floating around on Instagram, at least in these early days. For example, acclaimed digital artist Mike Winklemann, better known as “Beeple,” created “EVERYDAYS: The First 5000 Days,” possibly the most famous NFT of the moment, which sold at Christie’s for a record-breaking $69.3 million.

    NFTs and Cryptocurrency – Differences?

    The term “non-fungible token” refers to a token that is not fungible. It’s usually programmed in the same way as cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin or Ethereum, but that’s where the similarities end.

    Cryptocurrencies and physical money are both “fungible,” meaning they may be traded or exchanged for one another. They’re also worth the same amount of money—one dollar is always worth another dollar and one Bitcoin is always worth another Bitcoin. The fungibility of cryptocurrency makes it a secure way to execute blockchain transactions.

    NFTs aren’t like other materials. Each contains a digital signature that prevents NFTs from being substituted for or compared to one another (hence, non-fungible). Simply because they’re both NFTs, one NBA Top Shot clip isn’t the same as EVERYDAYS.

    What is the use of NFT?

    Artists and content creators have a one-of-a-kind opportunity to monetize their work thanks to blockchain technology and NFTs. Artists, for example, no longer have to sell their work through galleries or auction houses. Instead, the artist can sell it as an NFT straight to the consumer, allowing them to keep a larger portion of the profit. Additionally, artists can integrate royalties into their software so that they receive a share of sales when their work is sold to a new owner. This is a desirable feature because most artists do not receive subsequent proceeds after their first sale.

    Making money using NFTs isn’t limited to art. To raise money for charity, companies like Charmin and Taco Bell have auctioned off themed NFT art. Taco Bell’s NFT art sold out in minutes, with the highest bids coming in at 1.5 wrapped ether (WETH)—equal to $3,723.83 at the time of writing. Charmin’s offering was dubbed “NFTP” (non-fungible toilet paper), and Taco Bell’s NFT art sold out in minutes, with the highest bids coming in at 1.5 wrapped ether (WETH)—equal to $3,723.83 at the time of writing.

    In February, Nyan Cat, a 2011 GIF depicting a cat with a pop-tart body, sold for nearly $600,000. As of late March, NBA Top Shot had grossed more than $500 million in sales. A single LeBron James highlight sold for more than $200,000. Snoop Dogg, Lindsay Lohan, Amitabh Bachchan, and Salman Khan are among the celebrities who have jumped on the NFT bandwagon, sharing unique memories, artwork, and moments as securitized NFTs.

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